Reader Email: The dangers of wade fishing?

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Chris 2 weeks, 3 days ago.

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  • #416536
    ntaylor
    ntaylor
    Keymaster

    I have this discussion with my wife all the time.  She says I am going to die from a shark bite.     I am cautious out there and I have seen big sharks.     What, if any real risks are to there with standing in the water for fishing in Florida salt water?     What are the odds of a shark bite?   What else could happen?       Enjoy your site.  I have spent over 20 hours reading the articles.   This site is MASSIVE>

    Leonard K, Ruskin

  • #416537
    barrynfla
    barrynfla
    Participant

    Leonard, I’ve been wade fishing for almost 30 years and I’m still around. lol I think the odds of a shark bite are like a million to one. The number one danger is stingrays. A sting will probably not kill you, although the infection by one could, but the danger is being alone in fairly deep water, getting stung, and going down. If you do the “stingray shuffle” you’ll probably be okay.
    Lightning is something else to watch out for. As the old saying goes, if you can hear thunder you can get hit by lightning. I’m very cautious about this. No fish is worth it.
    In all my years wading I’ve never heard of any wade fisherman getting a shark bite locally. Nor do I know of any lightning strikes. It’s not that unusual to get stung by a stingray but most are relatively minor incidents. Nobody I know personally has ever told me he was stung.
    Go out, be cautious, have fun and catch fish!

  • #416548
    delta9
    delta9
    Participant

    In my roughly 10 years or so I spent wade fishing the TB area,  I would say you have a higher concern of getting cut up by a broken beer bottle or trash of some sort than you do getting bit by a shark.

    With that being said, I have still had my fair share of encounters while wading.  Never had a shark get aggressive and it’s always good to keep in mind they are more than likely just curious.  Being cognizant of your surroundings at all times is key to staying safe.

     

  • #416578
    Neil Taylor
    Neil Taylor
    Keymaster

    I spent my first ten years in Florida.   I would say the only real danger:  Jellyfish.    I say, no worse pain on Earth.

    I have been standing in the water in the middle of a shark feeding frenzy.   And I was never even touched.

    Walking in the water, you have to use the right technique or you will step on stingrays.   You do it right, this should never happen

  • #416581

    colonole1
    Participant

    I hear you on the jellyfish. Two experiences in my childhood–1)…at the beach…”Oh look at the pretty blue bubble with the strings hanging down, lets take it back and show mama!” 2)…hundreds of clear jelly blobs stranded on a flat…the first 30-40 seconds of throwing them at each other, splattering us all over, was fun (it took the nematacists just about that long to do their thing). All in all, the Man O’War was NOT funny. (Peeing on on it actually does work, by the way.)

    One of my luckier days, wading a flat in the panhandle when a sudden thunderstorm sent me racing back to the car. I stepped squarely in the middle on a stingray, and he missed me.

  • #416583

    Hook I
    Participant

    your chances of getting hit by lightning than a shark bite , wearing Kevlar sole wading shoes / booties I think is a must . As mentioned rays, glass, & even metal , nothing wrong w/ a pair of wading pants to protect you from the jellyfish .

    As in the North East you have a very large tidal drop which can strand you on a sand bar , w/ fog coming in you can be lost , a compass is a great way of knowing your return as knowing you tide change .

    My wife hates me fishing alone also but a note , phone call when I change locations helps . Sometimes you loose cell connection too.

  • #416584

    Chris
    Participant

    Just bought a pair of waders last week after having some success with reds on foot.  I got a mid 30s red on fly and promptly decided I needed to do more wading since I can get much closer to them and play the finesse game.

    On the lightning thing…I’ve been struck on boats twice.  You have to be really, really careful on the back side of a storm.  We were 10 miles south of a storm that was moving north…and we got popped good.  Very scary stuff.  Buddy had to replace some wiring and electronics that got fried.   We were happy to get home in one piece.  Almost got knocked out of the boat.  Would have been bad on foot or the SUP.

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